Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Agility and Workflow – Part 9 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.
Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.
The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®
REAP CCOB for Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are dealing with Agility & Workflow which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.
Transformation Intent – Agility and Workflow
“The ability to deliver a customer-centric experience is dependent on the speed at which your organisation can mobilise itself so that you can meet the changing needs of your customers and act on new opportunities as soon as they arise. In order to do this you need an agile decision-making infrastructure that is supported by efficient and technology-enabled processes that integrate teams and deliver on the opportunities for real-time responses.”

What Good Looks Like – Agility and Workflow
• The organisation is set up to take customer insight and feedback through to new or amended processes / propositions quickly and is checking that customers perceive this agility.

• Processes are actively managed to ensure the right people receive the right prompts and information at the right time and are able to action it within defined timelines.

• The opportunities and customer need for real-time working are understood and the relevant data is available to enable clear movement towards this in the most important areas.

• Collaboration between customer-impacting colleagues is encouraged and enabled by relevant technology on an overall basis as well as being targeted at specific areas of need.

• Centres of Excellence are used to formerly incubate and develop good practices in one part of the organisation in a way that is specifically designed to support ‘packaged’ transfer of learning across the enterprise.

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

Advertisements

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Experience Management – Part 8 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.
Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.
The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®
REAP CCOB for Blog

This week we are dealing with Experience Management which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.

Transformation Intent – Experience Management

“Achieving excellence in customer experience is about finding ways to create products, services and experiences that positively and profitably influence what people think, feel and do. This calls for the ability to design and deliver innovative, differentiated, economic and relevant customer experiences across every channel and touch point ensuring that both physical and emotional elements are addressed. ”

What Good Looks Like – Experience Management

• Appropriate (i.e. not too much) quantitative and qualitative research is carried out into customer satisfaction in a format that aims to be predictive of future loyalty and to take customer expectation levels into account.

• On-line and off-line mechanisms are in place to ensure that a wide range of staff (junior to senior) listen to customers as well as those whose job it is to do so. Processes ensure that the organisation reacts to what is being said without over-reacting to potential ‘noise’.

• Based on these insights the customer experience is designed, engineered, documented and adjusted by expert resources with a focus on the customers’ emotional needs as well as functional requirements.

• Clearly different experiences can be delivered to different values of customer without causing undue dissatisfaction of lower value customers.

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

Flashes of Thought: Building & Leading Customer-Centric Enterprise


Transforming business is disruptive. The big challenge for any organisation is to keep the business going – to drive small incremental changes whilst acknowledging and understanding the ultimate disruptive outcome of finding new and unique ways to create, deliver and capture value. If the enterprise is disciplined in its approach, i.e. it builds a deep understanding of its current level of customer-centric capability and is clear about the nature of customer-centricity to which it aspires to in three or four years time, then the transformational programme can be prioritized accordingly.

Here are 9 ‘flashes of thought’ from my book – The Customer Centric Blueprint

*As part of the rapid transformation that our world is going through, your customers are becoming more powerful and demanding. Adopting a customer-centric business model is a way to ensure a competitive edge.

*“One of the most important questions of our current time is: ‘How do we stay relevant in this uncertain and changing world?’”
The cornerstone of the customer-centric business model is the concept of the “outside-in” company, one that views the world through the lens of the customer and then is able to effectively interact with the customer to meet his or her needs.

*From a systems-thinking perspective, it is important to utilize customer management in a way that develops “interconnectivity across all the areas of the business that touch upon and affect the customer.”

*“The customer-centric approach to measurement would not be complete without connecting those specific operational measures to employee engagement which, in turn, creates customer engagement and ultimately profitability through your key value drivers.”
Earned media measures – likes, comments, and shares – should be measured so you are able to understand where customers are amplifying your brand message.

*“While impressions are directly linked to the efforts you have made to put content in front of people, expressions are a much more powerful measurement of the extent of your customer engagement.”

*Customer-centricity as a business model means finding new ways to create, deliver, and capture value.
Implementing a customer-centric approach is a journey with a starting point, but no clear ending; the model will grow along with your company’s understanding and evolution.

The Customer-Centric Blueprint

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Channels and Media – Part 7 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.

Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.

The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®

 

 

REAP CCOB for Blog

This week we are dealing with Channels & Media which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.

Transformation Intent – Channels and Media

“Channels are critical vehicles through which you deliver a superior, consistent and relevant customer experience. In order to do so effectively, your channels and the media you use to transmit your message both need to be integrated and individually optimised to manage this consistency and deliver an appropriate return on investment from a customer value perspective. Your organisation also needs to be dynamic and strategic in how you leverage the new forms of media and digital channels.”

What Good Looks Like – Channels and Media

  • Organisational structures and roles explicitly facilitate cross-channel  management as well as ‘within channel’. There is a clear overall channel strategy covering ‘earned’ (social) channels as well as formal ‘owned’ and ‘paid’ channels.
  •  Channels and media are individually optimized using appropriate techniques and technology. The balance between media/channels is also optimised, recognising both customer needs and internal / profitability requirements.
  •  Prospects and customers are managed across and between channels with a clear focus on getting customers and serious prospects into owned channels. However, the relevance and value of earned digital and social media is fully understood and they are actively used within the channel mix.
  •  There is a clear focus and ‘production engine’ for engaging and interesting content that can be used across multiple channels and released virally.

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Brand and Proposition – Part 6 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.

Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.

The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®

 REAP CCOB for Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are dealing with Brand & Proposition which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.

Transformation Intent – Brand and Proposition

“Customer-centricity recognises and encourages the value of brand equity as an intangible asset, which is not created through gimmicks, but through an emotional connection with customers that communicates a clear value proposition and engages their participation in the creation of that proposition. Transform your approach to the design and development of your products and services by embracing customer-focused change and innovating on behalf of your customers, while keeping your eye on the competition.”

What Good Looks Like – Brand and Proposition

  • The customer proposition/s and experience are clearly recognised and managed as being inextricably linked to the organisation’s brand/s. Each deeply informs the other.
  • The overall proposition is clearly defined, easily understood and the organisation checks that staff & partners can communicate it effectively and that customers at least understand it. Innovation in terms of proposition is actively stimulated, managed and rewarded in staff and partners.
  • There is a spirit and strategy of co-creation in everything that the organisation does.  This does not mean ‘management by committee’, but a willingness to look for ideas and innovation from as diverse an audience as possible.
  • The overall proposition is also tailored for at least the most important customer segments with processes in place to prevent ‘leakage’ of proposition elements from higher value to lower value segments.
  • The way that the proposition/s compares to those of competitors, its relative strengths and weaknesses and how those should be used at the front line, is understood and communicated.

 

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Insight and Planning – Part 5 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.

Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.

The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®

 

REAP CCOB for Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are dealing with Insight & Planning which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.

Transformation Intent – Insight and Planning

“Whereas data management ensures that the quality and priority of critical customer information enables a customer-centric approach, insight and planning translates that data into meaningful patterns of customer drivers and behaviour. With this understanding you can transform your approach to defining your customers’ needs from an outside-in perspective, thereby segmenting them correctly and, thus becoming capable of delivering a relevant and superior customer experience, while being mindful of your competitors’ manoeuvres.”

What Good Looks Like – Data Management

  • The current and changing nature of customer transactional behaviour is understood in its own right and in terms of how it relates to other behaviours. Non-transactional behaviours (both on-line and off-line) are captured and analysed as well as being researched at the market level.
  • The nature and relative importance of own-customer and overall market needs (as opposed to satisfaction) are understood.
  • A clear and consistently applied segmentation framework is in place at the detailed analytical level and at an operational level that drives differences in the ways that customers are actually managed. The segmentation extends beyond financial value into dimensions such as needs, attitudes etc.
  • There is an explicit customer dimension to business planning activity that considers planned revenue / margin improvements, by customer segment, by the value drivers that will deliver them. The range of competitors likely to impact the organisation’s ability to achieve these plans have been identified and their action / reaction is both predicted and monitored.

 

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y