Customer Centricity = Sustainability = Customer Centricity = Superior Business Performance


In a recently published article (MIT Sloan Management Review – How to Become a Sustainable Company)the authors point to a study that supports the view that ‘high sustainability’ companies significantly outperformed their counterparts over an 18 year period in terms of both stock market and accounting criteria, such as return on assets and return on equity. Also, stock market performance was higher and there was lower performance volatility. We can therefore conclude that sustainability makes good business sense.
The term ‘sustainable company’ is spoken about and referred to fairly frequently these days. At the core of this trend is the fact that consumers and the general public are not satisfied with businesses that focus solely on short-term profit maximisation. People want businesses to be far more considerate of broad based human needs.
In this context ‘sustainability’ refers to a business philosophy based on balancing financial, social and environmental considerations.
I am a firm believer and supporter of ‘sustainable enterprise’ – I also have this expectation that if a business can balance financial, social and environmental issues then surely they should add ‘customer experience’ to the list? After all, why waste the energy and effort to address social and environmental considerations (which ‘speak’ to us and can therefore be used to create greater levels of loyalty and advocacy) if they don’t design and deliver a differentiated customer experience.
Sadly, I’m a customer of a couple of ‘sustainable’ companies that deliver a customer experience that is mediocre at best and downright unacceptable at worst. This got me thinking from two perspectives – firstly, building organisational capability for sustainability is similar to building organisational capability to deliver differentiated experiences. Secondly, if an organisation is committed to ‘sustainability’ yet doesn’t focus on customer experience, should we be more accepting of mediocrity in delivery of those customer experiences? I say NO! NO! NO! In fact, Customer Experience and Sustainability should go hand in hand – one without the other is indicative of opposing forces.
Your thoughts?

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Penetration – Increasing Customer Value – Part 14b of 14c


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.

Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.

The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®

REAP CCOB for Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are dealing with Penetration which is one of the four Execution capability areas represented. The Execution layer relates to the capabilities and control levers needed to optimise customer value and includes Retention, Efficiency (understanding cost to serve), Acquisition and Penetration (customer development, cross-sell and up-sell) – collectively referred to as REAP. These are capabilities and initiatives that can be optimised in the short term.

These capabilities support your ability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) as well as the Enabling capabilities already discussed in Part 1 to 10 of this series of blog posts.

Each of the four Execution capability areas is made up of sub-components. The Penetration dimension relates to the ability to develop more value from existing customers through cross-sell and up-sell activities to improve return on customer investment. Formal management of high value customers and key accounts is a critical part of this. It also requires clarity as to how you deal with low value customers from a development perspective, if at all. The 3 sub-components of the Penetration dimension are ‘Understanding Customer Value,’  ‘Increasing Customer Value,’ and ‘Managing High Value Customers.’ Each of these areas is addressed in separate, individual blog posts.

Transformation Intent – Penetration

“Delivering sustainable and superior business performance requires the on-going development and growth in the value of your customer base. To do this you need to have an in-depth understanding of your customer value so that you can identify opportunities to increase this value. This potential uplift is then supported through relevant propositions, cross-selling, up-selling, indirect value creation and expansion of existing product usage. In treating different customers differently, high value customers should also be given special attention so that the right team equipped with the necessary budget can deliver on their specific needs.”

What Good Looks Like – Increasing Customer Value

  • Value development is managed as a business discipline (like acquisition or retention) with: clear ownership / responsibility; detailed planning; specific propositions; checks that it is generating incremental value.
  • Active stimulation mechanisms are in place to increase usage / value / frequency of purchasing the organisations’ core products.
  • Opportunities to sell ‘up’ to a higher level of value are sought and supported by appropriate offers, especially at point of sale.
  • Cross-selling is driven through both outbound and inbound channels, based on clear rules-of-engagement and prompts to ensure appropriate offers are made from the organisation’s whole portfolio.
  • Low value customers are identified against clear definitions and specifically dealt with so as to drive up their value or at least prevent it being made worse.
  • The valuation of customers and stimulation of this value extends beyond pure transaction value, into areas such as advocacy and referral.

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Agility and Workflow – Part 9 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.
Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.
The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®
REAP CCOB for Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are dealing with Agility & Workflow which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.
Transformation Intent – Agility and Workflow
“The ability to deliver a customer-centric experience is dependent on the speed at which your organisation can mobilise itself so that you can meet the changing needs of your customers and act on new opportunities as soon as they arise. In order to do this you need an agile decision-making infrastructure that is supported by efficient and technology-enabled processes that integrate teams and deliver on the opportunities for real-time responses.”

What Good Looks Like – Agility and Workflow
• The organisation is set up to take customer insight and feedback through to new or amended processes / propositions quickly and is checking that customers perceive this agility.

• Processes are actively managed to ensure the right people receive the right prompts and information at the right time and are able to action it within defined timelines.

• The opportunities and customer need for real-time working are understood and the relevant data is available to enable clear movement towards this in the most important areas.

• Collaboration between customer-impacting colleagues is encouraged and enabled by relevant technology on an overall basis as well as being targeted at specific areas of need.

• Centres of Excellence are used to formerly incubate and develop good practices in one part of the organisation in a way that is specifically designed to support ‘packaged’ transfer of learning across the enterprise.

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Experience Management – Part 8 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.
Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.
The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®
REAP CCOB for Blog

This week we are dealing with Experience Management which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.

Transformation Intent – Experience Management

“Achieving excellence in customer experience is about finding ways to create products, services and experiences that positively and profitably influence what people think, feel and do. This calls for the ability to design and deliver innovative, differentiated, economic and relevant customer experiences across every channel and touch point ensuring that both physical and emotional elements are addressed. ”

What Good Looks Like – Experience Management

• Appropriate (i.e. not too much) quantitative and qualitative research is carried out into customer satisfaction in a format that aims to be predictive of future loyalty and to take customer expectation levels into account.

• On-line and off-line mechanisms are in place to ensure that a wide range of staff (junior to senior) listen to customers as well as those whose job it is to do so. Processes ensure that the organisation reacts to what is being said without over-reacting to potential ‘noise’.

• Based on these insights the customer experience is designed, engineered, documented and adjusted by expert resources with a focus on the customers’ emotional needs as well as functional requirements.

• Clearly different experiences can be delivered to different values of customer without causing undue dissatisfaction of lower value customers.

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Brand and Proposition – Part 6 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.

Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.

The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®

 REAP CCOB for Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are dealing with Brand & Proposition which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.

Transformation Intent – Brand and Proposition

“Customer-centricity recognises and encourages the value of brand equity as an intangible asset, which is not created through gimmicks, but through an emotional connection with customers that communicates a clear value proposition and engages their participation in the creation of that proposition. Transform your approach to the design and development of your products and services by embracing customer-focused change and innovating on behalf of your customers, while keeping your eye on the competition.”

What Good Looks Like – Brand and Proposition

  • The customer proposition/s and experience are clearly recognised and managed as being inextricably linked to the organisation’s brand/s. Each deeply informs the other.
  • The overall proposition is clearly defined, easily understood and the organisation checks that staff & partners can communicate it effectively and that customers at least understand it. Innovation in terms of proposition is actively stimulated, managed and rewarded in staff and partners.
  • There is a spirit and strategy of co-creation in everything that the organisation does.  This does not mean ‘management by committee’, but a willingness to look for ideas and innovation from as diverse an audience as possible.
  • The overall proposition is also tailored for at least the most important customer segments with processes in place to prevent ‘leakage’ of proposition elements from higher value to lower value segments.
  • The way that the proposition/s compares to those of competitors, its relative strengths and weaknesses and how those should be used at the front line, is understood and communicated.

 

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Insight and Planning – Part 5 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.

Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.

The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®

 

REAP CCOB for Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are dealing with Insight & Planning which is one of the six Enabling capability areas represented. The Enablers explore the components needed to energise your transformation and will invariably involve changes that can be planned for within the current business cycle, for implementation in the next budgetary or operating period. These components support your capability to implement your chosen customer strategies and rely on the fundamental building blocks (Foundations) already discussed in Part 1 to 4 of this series of blog posts.

Transformation Intent – Insight and Planning

“Whereas data management ensures that the quality and priority of critical customer information enables a customer-centric approach, insight and planning translates that data into meaningful patterns of customer drivers and behaviour. With this understanding you can transform your approach to defining your customers’ needs from an outside-in perspective, thereby segmenting them correctly and, thus becoming capable of delivering a relevant and superior customer experience, while being mindful of your competitors’ manoeuvres.”

What Good Looks Like – Data Management

  • The current and changing nature of customer transactional behaviour is understood in its own right and in terms of how it relates to other behaviours. Non-transactional behaviours (both on-line and off-line) are captured and analysed as well as being researched at the market level.
  • The nature and relative importance of own-customer and overall market needs (as opposed to satisfaction) are understood.
  • A clear and consistently applied segmentation framework is in place at the detailed analytical level and at an operational level that drives differences in the ways that customers are actually managed. The segmentation extends beyond financial value into dimensions such as needs, attitudes etc.
  • There is an explicit customer dimension to business planning activity that considers planned revenue / margin improvements, by customer segment, by the value drivers that will deliver them. The range of competitors likely to impact the organisation’s ability to achieve these plans have been identified and their action / reaction is both predicted and monitored.

 

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y

 

Customer-Centric Transformation: What Good Looks Like – Data Management – Part 4 of 14


Designing and executing a customer-centric business model requires end to end organisational alignment. Customer-centric capability development cannot take place in isolation to the rest of the business. The customer-centric journey requires a clear quantified understanding of current organisational capability across all 14 capability areas of the SCHEMA® Customer Management framework in the centre of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint below. As important as an understanding of current customer management capability is, so too is an understanding of the capability to which the organisation aspires.

Each week I’ll address another single capability area, sharing with you the Transformation Intent to which your organisation should commit to, as well as ‘What Good Looks Like’ for those organisations that have achieved a fairly high level of maturity in the respective capability area.

The REAP Customer-Centric Organisation Blueprint®

 

 REAP CCOB for Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week we are dealing with Data Management which is one of the four Foundational capability areas represented. The Foundations layer includes the fundamental building blocks that support or limit your transformation ability. These capability areas require broad-based input and alignment, without which the operationalization of a customer-centric business model is almost impossible.

Transformation Intent – Data Management

“Customer-centricity requires that you provide your customer with a consistent and integrated experience. Without the right, quality customer data that is consolidated across multiple sources into a single view, this is not possible. In order to transform your customer data management and deliver the business case for it, you need to measure, manage and report on your customer data as a vital and valuable organisational asset, while holding the protection of the trust placed in you as sacred.”

What Good Looks Like – Data Management

  • The collection and quality management of customer information is driven by a documented strategy that recognises the financial and strategic value of customer information as well as its tactical value.
  • Structured and unstructured data that can be ‘owned’ by the organisation is built in a co-ordinated way from clearly understood internal and external sources.
  • Customer Information quality is managed / reported against clear definitions and its continual improvement is supported by systems, realistic budgets and informed staff who understand the importance of doing so.
  • The changing nature of data being generated in non-owned locations (Cloud data) is kept under active review and opportunities to use or even acquire it are investigated and implemented where appropriate.
  • Privacy and appropriate usage of customer data is as focused on delivering against customer requirements as it is on meeting regulatory conditions and is kept under constant review with the emergence of new media.

For more insight into customer-centric business model innovation as well as more insight into this particular area of the REAP Customer-Centric Blueprint, please see my book “The Customer-Centric Blueprint’ – http://amzn.to/ZILg4y